New York City IVC Filter Lawsuit Attorney

In 2004, a 45-year-old woman named Dodi Froehlich was in a serious car accident. To prevent a dangerous blood clot from lodging in her lungs or brain, her medical team implanted a inferior vena cava (IVC) filter into one of her veins to capture any clots that might be dangerous.

Just four months later, Froehlich suffered a severe headache and then lost consciousness. Part of the spider-like IVC filter had broken off and traveled through her body to her heart. There, the shard pierced the vital organ and nearly killed her. She was saved through emergency open-heart surgery, but many others have not been so lucky. If you have been a victim of complications with a IVC filter, contact our New York City defective drug lawyers today at Meirowitz & Wasserberg, LLP.

Blood Clot Filters: Dangerous & Deadly

Froehlich is just one of thousands of patients who have suffered adverse medical events due to a retrievable blood clot filter. The devices have a history of migrating to other parts of the body, or breaking within the patients and having fragments migrate.

Several types of retrievable blood clot filters have been implicated:

  • Cook IVC Filters
  • Bard Recovery IVC Filters
  • Bard G2 IVC Filters

Even though IVC filters are designed to help prevent deadly blood clots, they can cause more harm than good. The devices, which are often used in patients who cannot use anticoagulant medications and oral blood thinners, may be effective for short periods of time, but become more and more dangerous the longer they are in the body.

Defective IVC Filter Timeline

2001-2003: The FDA approves several types of  retrievable blood clot filters, including devices developed by Bard and Cook.

2004: Bard begins receiving a significant number of adverse event reports regarding its Recovery IVC filter. The company discontinues, but does not recall, the filter, and begins manufacturing new kinds of filters instead.

2010: After learning of mounting adverse effects, the  FDA issues a warning telling doctors to remove retrievable IVC filters as soon patients are no longer in danger of blood clots.

2012: The first three class action lawsuits are filed against IVC filter companies regarding defective and dangerous filters.

2014: The FDA releases another safety warning to doctors, stating that IVC filters become more dangerous the longer they are in the body, and recommending the filters are removed between 29 and 54 days after insertion.

2015: A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that IVC filters were only half as effective as traditional blood thinners at preventing pulmonary embolism. Just months later, a second study in JAMA reported that any health benefits of IVC filters are negated by their long-term health effects.

2015: The FDA sends a warning letter to Bard regarding its illegal marketing strategies for their filters as well as the dangerous of their Denali IVC Filter.

Free Consultations | IVC Filter Lawsuit

If you have been injured by a retrievable blood clot filter, or if a loved one has died due to an IVC filter, you may wish to speak with a defective medical device attorney about your case. You could be owed compensation for your losses, which could include:

  • Past and future medical bills.
  • Lost wages and future lost wages.
  • Pain and suffering.
  • Permanent disabilities.
  • Wrongful death.

We offer private, no-obligation consultations. To speak with an attorney, learn more about our legal services, or schedule your appointment, please contact our personal injury lawyers at Meirowitz & Wasserberg.